Learning about the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)

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chapter27Today I attended a monthly meeting of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter 27 at Meriden-Markham Airport in Meriden, Connecticut. The EAA started out in 1953 as a flying club for people who built and flew their own airplanes, but it has evolved into a more diverse group of aviation enthusiasts. They have become famous for their sponsorship of the world-renowned yearly fly-in, the EAA AirVenture at Osh Kosh, Wisconsin attracting thousands of aircraft and hundreds of thousands spectators and participants. The EAA’s mission is “To grow participation in aviation by promoting the ‘Spirit of Aviation,'” while their vision is “A vibrant and growing aviation community.” To carry out this mission and vision, EAA sponsors some youth activities, which is my focus as the teacher in the Academy of Aerospace and Engineering.

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EAA Chapter 27 Young Eagles orientation flight

One of the main EAA youth programs is Young Eagles where EAA pilots spend a day giving free orientation flights in their aircraft to children ages 8 to 17. The purpose is to trigger an interest in aviation that young people will carry forward in life. So far, the EAA has given about 2 million orientation flights to children nationwide since the start of Young Eagles in 1992. The next Young Eagles day for EAA Chapter 27 is Saturday, October 10th, 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM, at Meriden-Markham Airport. Click HERE for more information and any updates on this event, as well as the point of contact.

The EAA is a great organization for anyone interested in aviation, regardless of whether you are a pilot or own an aircraft. For more information on the local opportunities, contact EAA Chapter 27’s President, Bob Spaulding. For my students, Bob will speak at the Academy of Aerospace and Engineering on September 18th and have information about the next Young Eagles event on October 10th. We look forward to learning more about this great aviation organization.

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